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Research Coins: Feature Auction

 
591722
Sale: Triton V, Lot: 1722. Estimate $600. 
Closing Date: Wednesday, 16 January 2002. 
Sold For $480. This amount does not include the buyer’s fee.

TROAS, Ilium. Gordian III.. 238-244 AD. Æ 37mm (23.23 gm). AV K [M] AN[T] GOPÐIAN[OC CEB], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / [E]KTW-R, ILIEWN in exergue, Hektor charging left in chariot, holding shield and spear in right hand and raising left. Bellinger T293; SNG von Aulock 1543; Cornell 103 (this coin). Near Fine, brown patina, porous, two edge splits. ($600)

From the David Simpson Collection. Ex Edward J. Waddell Auction II (12 September 1987), lot 345. In Homer's Iliad warriors are portrayed as riding to battle in chariots driven by other soldiers or by specialist drivers. The warriors then fought on foot, and chariots were held nearby, ready for retreat if necessary. There was little in the way of formal tactics for fighting from chariots, their main purpose being to deliver a warrior swiftly to a desired location on the field of battle. They were used in any attempts to charge or break enemy formations. (NEW PARAGRAPH)Hektor, literally ‘holder’ or ‘resister’, the son of the Trojan king Priam and Hekabe, and husband of Andromache and father of Astyanax, was the bravest of the Trojan heroes and a favorite of Apollo. Hektor is here depicted charging in his chariot. With Apollo's help he killed Patroklos and so obliged Achilles to join the other Greeks in fighting the Trojans. After killing Hektor with the help of Athena, Achilles stripped him of his armour, and, tying him to his chariot by the purple baldric that Ajax had given him, dragged him ignominiously around the walls of Troy.

In Homer's Iliad warriors are portrayed as riding to battle in chariots driven by other soldiers or by specialist drivers. The warriors then fought on foot, and chariots were held nearby, ready for retreat if necessary. There was little in the way of formal tactics for fighting from chariots, their main purpose being to deliver a warrior swiftly to a desired location on the field of battle. They were used in any attempts to charge or break enemy formations.

Hektor, literally ‘holder’ or ‘resister’, the son of the Trojan king Priam and Hekabe, and husband of Andromache and father of Astyanax, was the bravest of the Trojan heroes and a favorite of Apollo. Hektor is here depicted charging in his chariot. With Apollo's help he killed Patroklos and so obliged Achilles to join the other Greeks in fighting the Trojans. After killing Hektor with the help of Athena, Achilles stripped him of his armour, and, tying him to his chariot by the purple baldric that Ajax had given him, dragged him ignominiously around the walls of Troy.