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Research Coins: Feature Auction

 
89000067

Eurea. Lot of 3 coins.

Triton XV, Lot: 67. Estimate $200.
Sold for $1700. This amount does not include the buyer’s fee.

Lot of 3 coins.

(67.1) THESSALY, Eurea. Circa 352-344 BC. Æ Trichalkon (22.5mm, 7.76 g, 3h). Head of a nymph 3/4 facing l., wearing pendant earring and double or torque-like necklace; vine leaves and bunches of grapes in her hair / ΕΥΡΕΑΙΩΝ above circular, bunch of grapes on stalk with two vine leaves; to l. and above grapes, Λ. Helly, Quelques, p. 104, 4 and pl. 2, 9 (different dies and probably with the complete ethnic above); Rogers 211a var. [the text in Rogers refers to the Λ on the rev. being to the l. of the stalk but without mentioning the complete ethnic above]. Good VF, green patina with some light brown discoloration and metal flaws between 1 and 3 o’clock on the rev., scattered pitting on the obverse; an extremely rare variety.

Probably the only coin of this type with the Λ to the left of the stem and clearly showing that the last two letters of the ethnic are not separately placed below the grapes. Same obverse die as lot 66 above.

(67.2) THESSALY, Eurea. Circa 352-344 BC. Æ Trichalkon (20mm, 7.84 g, 5h). Head of a nymph 3/4 facing l., vine leaves and bunches of grapes in her hair / ΕΥΡΑΙΕ above, Ω-Ν below, bunch of grapes with two leaves hanging from stalk, above the grapes and to the l., Λ. Rogers 211a. Helly, Quelques, p. 103 citing the Rogers coin as the only one known of this type. VF, dark brown patina with some areas of dark red; very rare and apparently the second known of this variety.


(67.3) THESSALY, Eurea. Circa 352-344 BC. Æ Trichalkon (19mm, 6.49 g, 8h). Head of a nymph 3/4 facing l., vine leaves and bunches of grapes in her hair / ΕΥΡΕ and ΑΙΩ in two lines, in wreath tying to r. Helly, Quelques, p. 104, nos. 5 - 6 and pl. 2, nos. 10 - 11 var. [final Ν in the ethnic]. Good VF, dark olive green patina but one third of the coin’s surface has been destroyed by corrosion, probably caused by chemical fertilizers; 3rd known (?).

This type has never been offered for sale; the two other known examples are in the Athens Cabinet. An unusual detail on the reverse of this and the other two known coins of this type is that, on all three known examples, of three different reverse dies, the wreath ties to the right of the inscription. There must have been a specific reason for this anomaly as the vast majority of wreath reverses have their ties either below or, less frequently, above.